New Year Traditions around the World

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If you do a little research, you will come to know that whether in the west or the east of the world, the New Year is celebrated with equal enthusiasm everywhere.

New Year Traditions around the World

However, as the year on the calendar marks a transition, the various New Year traditions and customs followed during the period remain as they are. Here is a list of some of the interesting ways to celebrate the New Year around the world:

England: the English custom of welcoming the New Year is full of hospitality and warmth. They believe that the first guest of the year will bring them fortune.

He must be a man, he must enter through the front door and bring some traditional gifts such as bread for the kitchen, drink for the head of the family and coal to light the fire, otherwise it is not allowed. They believe that they bring good luck throughout the year.

Denmark: in Denmark, residents keep a pile of dishes, all broken, in front of the door. For this, they keep old dishes and people usually throw them at the doors of friends during the New Year. This symbolizes friendship and brotherhood and they believe that the one who has the most dishes out has the most friends. Some Danes skip some chairs during midnight.

China: The Chinese have a unique way of celebrating the New Year, in which each main door of a house is painted red, symbolizing happiness and good fortune. They hide all the knives of the day so that nobody cuts themselves, because in fact that can make the whole family have good luck for next year. However, that does not make any difference in the party they have during the time.

Brazil: Brazilians believe that lentils mean wealth and prosperity. So they serve foods that are made up of legumes like soup or rice in the New Year. On New Year’s Eve, the priestesses disguise themselves as blue and white for an auspicious ceremony held for the water goddess. Also a sacrificial boat full of jewels, candles and flowers from the beach of Rio de Janeiro is pushed to the ocean that gives them health, wealth and happiness.

Austria: Austrians find the amulet of good luck in piglets. They serve it at the dinner table with edible pigs and the mint ice creams are served as desserts for fortune.
German: lead is considered auspicious here. They pour molten lead into cold water and the shape that is taken later predicts the future. Heart shapes symbolize marriage, while round shapes denote good luck; the anchoring forms indicate that you need help; however, a cross means the sad death of someone.

Belgium: they call New Year’s Eve like San Silvestre Eva. They believe in organizing family parties, where everyone kisses, exchange greetings of fortune apart from the toasts to raise to celebrate the New Year in their own way.

Children usually save money to buy decorative items so they can write and give New Year greetings to the elderly.

Egypt: Egyptians believe that the New Year begins only when the crescent moon is visible in the sky. They create an extremely festive atmosphere and celebrate the New Year with happiness and joy. The official announcement is made in the city of Cairo in a sacred mosque, and religious leaders do what is necessary.
Greece: they call it St. Basil’s Day, one of the ancestors of the Greek Church, because it is also celebrated as its anniversary of death. They bake a special bread, where a coin is buried inside the dough. The procedure of serving bread is very unique. They offer the first slice to God, after the bread winner of the house, and the third is for the house. If it contains the currency, spring will arrive early that year. It is also assumed that whoever gets the slice with the coin will be blessed with extra good luck.

Wales: in Wales, during midnight, at the initial toll booth, the back door of the house opens for the first time and then closes immediately. This symbolizes the release of the old year and the blocking of all the bad luck it brought. In the 12th position of the clock, the door reopens to welcome the New Year with all its goodness, luck and prosperity.

Japan: the Japanese New Year or Oshogatsu is intended for celebrations with the family and begins with the proper decoration of the house to welcome luck and fortune. They clean the entire house, remove all financial responsibilities and solve all problems before the New Year arrives. They follow the traditions of three things: a branch of pine, called kadomatsu, denotes longevity; a bamboo stem symbolizes prosperity, while a plum blossom shows nobility. Before the clock strikes 12, 108 bells ring to show that the 108 problems have been eliminated.

Philippines: They believe that everything round is auspicious. So they consume grapes, they have coins, they wear dotted dresses, because they have faith that circular things attract more fortune and money. They also shed coins as the New Year begins to increase wealth and prosperity.

Spain: Spaniards eat 12 grapes at each toll of the clock during the new year. This they believe will bring good luck and happiness for the next 12 months.

Puerto Rico: People throw buckets of water through the window and also clean their houses properly. This they believe will cleanse the probabilities of last year and will also drive away the spirits of the house.

The Netherlands: bonfires are burned from Christmas trees on New Year’s Eve, in the streets, by the Dutch. This purges the old and greets the new.

Chile: people go to mass in the New Year, in addition to visiting the cemeteries. They make seating arrangements there and wait for the New Year, along with the corpses.

Rome: the celebrations last three days when the Romans decorate their houses with plants and colored lights, choose gifts for their loved ones with great care such as gold, silver, prosperity, honey, sweetness, etc.

United States: They believe that kissing during midnight as the year approaches is an auspicious gesture that purifies everything that is bad.

Cultures and traditions vary in different parts of the world, but almost all are destined to bring happiness, prosperity and good luck in the New Year. So, if you think you can be a bit more traditional this New Year, you can try any of the above.

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