Incredible 1963 Volkswagen Factory Pictures For Volkswagen Fans

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The Type 1 Beetle of 1961 had a 36 hp, 1200 cc four-cylinder OHV engine, air-cooled, four-cylinder, air-cooled, made of aluminum alloy blocks and heads.

In 1966, Type 1 came with a 1300 engine. By 1967, Type 1 had an engine of 1500 and 1600 in 1970. The air-cooled engine lost favor in the US market. UU With the advent of unleaded petrol and smog controls. These air-cooled engines were commonly tuned to be fuel-rich in order to control the engine’s overheating, and this led to excessive emissions of carbon monoxide. The VW production team eventually moved to Mexico, where vehicle emissions were not regulated. Beetles were popular on the west coast of the United States, where the heating of the limited capacity cabin was less inconvenient. Beetles became popular on the west coast of the USA. UU Like beach buggies and dune buggies.

VW expanded its product line in 1961 with the introduction of four Type 3 models (Karmann Ghia, Notchback, Fastback and Variant) based on the new Type 3 mechanical supports. The name ‘Squareback’ was used in the United States for the variant.

In 1969, the largest type 4 models (411 and 412) were introduced. These differ substantially from previous vehicles, with the notable introduction of monocoque / monobloc construction, the option of a fully automatic transmission, electronic fuel injection and a more robust engine.

Volkswagen added a “Super Beetle” (Type 131) to its lineup in 1971. The Type 131 differed from the standard Beetle in the use of a MacPherson front suspension instead of the usual torsion bars. The Super Beetle featured a new windshield with hood and padding and curved windshield (from model year 1973 onwards). The rack-and-pinion steering replaced the recirculating ball-steering gears in the 1974 model year onwards. The front of the car was stretched 2 inches (51 mm) to allow the spare wheel to be flat, and the combination of these two features increased the usable front luggage space.

In 1973, Volkswagen introduced the military type 181 or “Trekker” in Europe, “Thing” in America, remembering the type of war 82. The military version was produced for the German army of the NATO era during the war years Cold of 1970. until 1979. The American version only sold during two years, 1973 and 1974.

In 1964, Volkswagen acquired Auto Union, and in 1969, NSU Motorenwerke AG (NSU). The previous company owned the historic Audi brand, which had disappeared after World War II. In the end, VW merged Auto Union and NSU to create the modern Audi company, and would continue to develop it as its luxury vehicle brand. The purchase of Auto Union and NSU was a pivotal point in the history of Volkswagen, as both companies provided the technological expertise that was necessary for VW to survive when the demand for its air-cooled models went into decline.

By the end of 1972, Volkswagen had decided to cancel the nearly completed Typ 266, a project for an average motor car to replace the Beetle, and to focus on front-wheel drive and water-cooled cars. Rudolf Leiding, recently appointed head of Volkswagen, cited noise, heat and maintenance problems with the design of the central engine, as well as the difficulty of turning it into a truck.

1963 Volkswagen Factory Pictures

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

1963 Volkswagen Factory

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